Fiction Reveals Truth That Reality Obscures

Anna Bee, Wyoming, 24. College graduate, NPR junkie, nerd and feminist. I'm trying to figure out my future while keeping my ambitions alive.

I live for: movies with personality, discovering music, Autumn and brisk mornings, memories and feelings, classic books, reading the newspaper, remembering dreams, I hate change, and love simple pleasures. I'm nostalgic for my childhood, years gone by and past eras. Forever a cinephile. Please browse and enjoy.

ivashhkovs:

buffy meme: five characters

Rupert Giles

(via lisathevampireslayer)

melissablock:

Maybe you know the feeling. Call it an apple awakening: the moment when you realize there are infinitely more delights to be found in the universe of apples than Red Delicious (meh), McIntosh (booooring and prone to mushiness), or Granny Smith (holding up well for her age, but a one-note standby.)
My first apple awakening came early on, growing up in apple country in upstate New York, when my family switched from McIntosh loyalists to devotees of the Macoun (crisper, more full of flavor) and never looked back.
But my true initiation came in my 20s, when I went apple-picking at an heirloom orchard in the Virginia countryside.  Revelation! Apples of every shape and size and color, from rosy peach to deepest purple, with fabulous names:  Black Twig. Newtown Pippin.  Esopus Spitzenberg (a favorite of Thomas Jefferson).  Each with history, and a taste to make you rethink the essence of appleness.  
So imagine my delight when the book “Apples of Uncommon Character” landed in my mailbox, a glorious compendium of “123 heirlooms, modern classics, and little-known wonders.”  Author and self-described apple geek Rowan Jacobsen does for apples what he did earlier for oysters: he captures in vivid language what makes the flavor of each type unique (with extraordinary photographs by Clare Barboza you want to bite into.) 
One apple makes Jacobsen “think of the aurora borealis, of green ribbons of cold fire swaying against the blackness.”  Another is “tart and snappy, with an acid tongue and a rustic coarseness. Picture a ruddy barmaid in some nineteenth-century Holland tavern.”
Say no more. It’s clearly time for an All Things Considered apple foray.  I’m off, with producer Viet Le, to Scott Farm in Dummerston, Vermont. We’ll meet up with Rowan Jacobsen and the orchard manager, Ezekiel Goodband, and talk heirloom apples.  Word from Zeke is that Ananas Reinette, Claygate Pearmain, Chenango Strawberry, and Opalescent are among the dozens of varieties that may be ready for picking (and tasting.)  We’ll bring you the story next week on ATC, and will post photos from our visit here along the way.  

melissablock:

Maybe you know the feeling. Call it an apple awakening: the moment when you realize there are infinitely more delights to be found in the universe of apples than Red Delicious (meh), McIntosh (booooring and prone to mushiness), or Granny Smith (holding up well for her age, but a one-note standby.)

My first apple awakening came early on, growing up in apple country in upstate New York, when my family switched from McIntosh loyalists to devotees of the Macoun (crisper, more full of flavor) and never looked back.

But my true initiation came in my 20s, when I went apple-picking at an heirloom orchard in the Virginia countryside.  Revelation! Apples of every shape and size and color, from rosy peach to deepest purple, with fabulous names:  Black Twig. Newtown Pippin.  Esopus Spitzenberg (a favorite of Thomas Jefferson).  Each with history, and a taste to make you rethink the essence of appleness. 

So imagine my delight when the book “Apples of Uncommon Character” landed in my mailbox, a glorious compendium of “123 heirlooms, modern classics, and little-known wonders.”  Author and self-described apple geek Rowan Jacobsen does for apples what he did earlier for oysters: he captures in vivid language what makes the flavor of each type unique (with extraordinary photographs by Clare Barboza you want to bite into.)

One apple makes Jacobsen “think of the aurora borealis, of green ribbons of cold fire swaying against the blackness.”  Another is “tart and snappy, with an acid tongue and a rustic coarseness. Picture a ruddy barmaid in some nineteenth-century Holland tavern.”

Say no more. It’s clearly time for an All Things Considered apple foray.  I’m off, with producer Viet Le, to Scott Farm in Dummerston, Vermont. We’ll meet up with Rowan Jacobsen and the orchard manager, Ezekiel Goodband, and talk heirloom apples.  Word from Zeke is that Ananas Reinette, Claygate Pearmain, Chenango Strawberry, and Opalescent are among the dozens of varieties that may be ready for picking (and tasting.)  We’ll bring you the story next week on ATC, and will post photos from our visit here along the way.  

(via nprontheroad)

…I stood upon the hill and the wind did rise and the sound of thunder rolled across the land. I placed my hands upon the tallest stone and travelled to a far, distant land. where i lived for a time amongst strangers who became lovers and friends. But one day, I saw the moon came out and the wind rose once more, so I touched the stones, and traveled back to my own land and took up again with a man I had left behind."

"She came back through the stones?"
"Aye, she did. They always do."

(Source: clairelizabethfraser, via fuckyeahoutlanderseries)

star wars scenes: [5/x] Episode IV: A New Hope » Binary Sunset.

(via foxyfoxy)

fuckindiva:

film meme | 2/3 genres 

Film noir

(via viviens-leighs)

vintagegal:

Ann Miller 1940’s

vintagegal:

Ann Miller 1940’s

(via deforest)


Mary Pickford in “Kiki”, 1931.

Mary Pickford in “Kiki”, 1931.

(Source: missmarlenedietrich, via deforest)

Peter and Jenna in Seoul, South Korea (requested by amypoand)

(Source: amyandrory, via foxyfoxy)

I am going to die surrounded by the biggest idiots in the galaxy.

(Source: iamnevertheone)

Film Genre Meme: horror (1/5)

Mother’s interrupted the course of our journey. She’s programmed to do that should certain conditions arise. They have. It seems that she has… intercepted a transmission of unknown origin. She got us up to check it out.

Alien (1979)

(via foxyfoxy)

(Source: gloriaswanson, via deforest)

salesonfilm:

lepoinconneurdeslilas:

Elba & Fassbender 

now that’s a party

salesonfilm:

lepoinconneurdeslilas:

Elba & Fassbender

now that’s a party

(Source: discokuusisto, via wednesdaydreams)

melancholyellie:

Heading in for week two of jury duty this morning.
Myself and an elderly gent were the last two on my bus.
He asks, “Where are you off to sweetheart?”
I answer,
 ”High Court.”
He giggles, “What did you do?” And I laugh, getting ready to leave the bus.
He continues. “What are you in for? Stealing the hearts of men?”.
I smile modestly. “Manslaughter.”